Significant Music in History: Classical Music

There are so many amazing pieces of music that were created in the time history of history. Each era of history have significant compositions that are instantly reconisable and make such significant mark on history.

Here are three of my favourites in the Classical period:

  1. Beethoven – Für Elise

This was one of the main compositions that I played when I grew up playing the piano. Many years later, hen I was at music college, I included Beethoven in a research project on deaf msuic artists, arguing that one can still be a musician, even if they are deaf!

He started going deaf when he was 25 years old, and 10 years of tinnitus gradually took his his hearing. As I am deafened myself, it’s comforting to know that there was a composer who was deaf themselves. In his music, I feel his grief and mourning over losing his hearing, and I can relate to that.

Despite having no hearing, he still continued to compose music. He carved off his piano legs, and kneeled on the floor, placed his head on the piano, and composed on it.¹ I think it is incredible, espically during the late 18th century when nothing could have been done for deaf people.

 In his music, I feel his grief and mourning over losing his hearing, and I can relate to that.

He is certainly an inspiration for me, and if I want to feel anthing close to my heart, he is one to listen. listening to this piece, and playing it on the piano.

Für Elise is one of his most famous pieces; it is thought that he composed for a girl he was in love with. No evidence has been found about this,so we will never know.

  1. Mozart – Eine Kleine Nachtmusik

Mozart is another composer that I grew up playing, and listening, to. Is it said that if you listen to Mozart, you will become more intelligent. There’s something called The Mozart Effect.² His music does have a childlike essence that probably makes the mind want to expand. I’m not sure about this study, but either way, but I love Mozart, so I listen to him anyway.

I can imagine choreography when ballroom dancers dancing to this, and then ballet dancers dancing around them!

Listening to his compositions, you can tell that he was certainly a genius, and he started out very, very young.

This tune makes me want to dance, and I can imagine choreography when ballroom dancers dancing to this, and then ballet dancers dancing around them! It is quite the spectacle in my head.

  1. Vivaldi – Four Seasons

Vivaldi is an artist that I recently discovered in the last two years (although, I must have heard him when I was growing up too, because a few of the movements in this composition is very familar to me, including Spring and Winter).

I was watching Inspector Morse when the Spring tune came up in an episode featured in Italy. It is a light and happy tune, which I always play on a sunny spring day when I am in a very good mood. Or even when it is not spring, I am in a happy mood anyway (when I’m cooking something Italian)!

Like Mozart, [Vivaldi] was a young prodigy, who led a great and colourful life.

l don’t know much about Vivaldi. Today, I have learnt that like Mozart, he was a young prodigy, who led a great and colourful life. Despite this, he died alone, destitute, and unknown.³ I find it amusing that he grew up playing the violin, then went into priesthood, then turned his back on it. He was known as The Red Priest, so perhaps that is why he wore red in his well-known portrait.

Out of all the periods, Classical is my favourite. The peices are have stood the test of time by still being enjoyed, listen to and played, after all these years. There are also so many more composers throughout the various Classical eras that I should discuss here. Perhaps this will become a regular feature of mine…?

Watch this space!

¹ ArtsAlive.ca, Ludwig van Beethoven, 'Beethoven's Heartache' http://www.artsalive.ca/en/mus/greatcomposers/beethoven.html, 2015.   
² Claudia Hammond, BBC Future, Does Listening to Mozart Boost Your Brainpower?, 8 Jan 2013. 
³ Classic FM, Vivaldi: A Life, http://www.classicfm.com/composers/vivaldi/guides/vivaldi-life/#QdLyu4Ffu11sk5Gm.97, n.d.
In response to Writing 101 prompt: Commit to a Writing Practice.
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